Here are the California bills that would deal with wildfires, PG&E

Wildfires, utilities and their intersection appear to be a priority at the California State Capitol during this legislative session. Bills that have been introduced must go through committees in both houses of the legislature, the Assembly and the Senate. As such, this year’s bills must be passed and out of their “original home” by May 27. As this deadline approaches, one of the key committees is the Appropriations Committee, which deals with any bills or changes that would have tax implications. impact on the state. (Video above: How to know when to evacuate a wildfire.) These are bills in front of appropriations today that you should know. 24 hours before “performing non-emergency scheduled hot work, deploying an infrastructure protection and security team, or performing a prescribed or controlled burn within the district’s jurisdiction.” If they don’t, they could face a $500 penalty. The bill originally included notification of a “power outage for public safety”, but it was deleted in the amendments. over California with other electric utilities. It’s about looking at energy sharing between western states and trying to save consumers money. Assemblyman Holden introduced the bill. AB 2578 – This bill adds to the duties of the State Energy Commission by having them include, in their report every two years, the use of carbon capture or storage by power generation facilities. state electricity. So carbon reuse or storage, say, underground, should also be included in the report. AB 2705 – This bill by Assemblyman Quirk-Silva would prohibit a city or county from approving a housing project -called a “very high fire hazard area”-unless the city or county county deems it will meet fire hazard mitigation standards. It would also require the state fire marshal to provide financial assistance to harden off 300,000 homes in high-fire areas over the next three years…and another 300,000 over the next three years. AB 2322 – This bill from Assemblyman Wood would require the state fire marshal, before their next edition of building codes (expected to pass Jan. 1, 2023) to research and authorize building standards for fire resistance based on occupancy hazard categories in the California Very High, High, and Moderate Fire Severity Zones. The bill would also require the building commission to consider standards proposed by the fire marshal. | RELATED | California Wildfire Preparedness Guide 2022: What to know and how to stay safe

Wildfires, utilities, and their intersection appear to be the focus of the California State Capitol during this legislative session.

Bills that have been introduced must go through committees in both houses of the Legislative Assembly, the Assembly and the Senate. As such, this year’s bills must be passed and out of their “original home” by May 27. As this deadline approaches, one of the key committees is the Appropriations Committee, which deals with any bills or changes that would have tax implications. impact on the state.

(Video above: How to know when to evacuate a wildfire.)

These are bills in front of the appropriations today that you should know about.

AB 2070 – This bill would require an electric utility (like PG&E or SoCal Edison) to notify a fire district 24 hours before “perform scheduled and non-emergency hot work, deploy a security and infrastructure protection team, or perform a prescribed or controlled burn within the district’s jurisdiction. “If they don’t, they could face a $500 fine. Power Shutoff”, but it was deleted in the amendments.

ACR 188 – This is a resolution, not a bill, but it would request that Cal ISO produce a report examining the impact of expanded regional cooperation on California with other electric utilities. It’s about looking at energy sharing between western states and trying to save consumers money. Assemblyman Holden introduced the bill.

AB 2578 – This bill adds to the duties of the State Energy Commission by having it include in its report every two years the use of carbon capture or storage by electricity generating facilities in the state. Thus, the reuse of carbon or its storage, for example underground, should also be included in the report.

AB 2705 – This bill by Assemblyman Quirk-Silva would prohibit a city or county from approving a housing project in a so-called “extremely high fire risk area” unless the city or county county finds it will meet fire hazard mitigation standards. It would also require the state fire marshal to provide financial assistance to fireproof 300,000 homes in high-fire areas over the next three years…and another 300,000 over the next three years.

AB 2322 – This bill from Assemblyman Wood would require the state fire marshal, prior to the next edition of building codes (expected to pass Jan. 1, 2023), to research and authorize building standards for fire resistance according to occupancy risk categories in very high, high environments. and areas of moderate fire severity in California. The bill would also require the building commission to consider standards proposed by the fire marshal.

| RELATED | California Wildfire 2022 Preparedness Guide: What to Know and How to Stay Safe

Bernard P. Love